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Hands-Free Gardening

Eunice sometimes says she likes photos of my garden. I thought of that this week when I realized I had basically not done any gardening at all. I have not weeded since April and have not pruned anything in 2009, period. Even though my plan was to really hack back on the climbing roses that are truly wild.

I have been very busy indoors and with my work. This is what the garden did without my help (the roses here are fading, they were hot magenta five days before):

gardenhandsfree400.jpg

I did buy a few plants this year. When I remembered to tell Brian I’d purchased them, he put them in the ground for me. The plants in the ground have had to survive on rainwater, I have not used a hose yet.

I usually purchase geraniums and other small plants, and pot them for by the back stairs. This year I bought two large potted geraniums and stuck them, in the store pots, in the right spot. No contrast or variety this year, but a bit of color. No impatiens in the front this year. That’s how it goes.

Friends gave me 3 tomato plants of different kinds. I did water those small pots until I could put them in regular containers. I did the container thing in early July, much too late to have expectations of fruit. In spite of me, the smallest, a patio tomato, made two marble-sized fruits in its tiny temporary pot, and has bloomed again.

The largest is supposed to be an early tomato. It took about 5 days to realize it could set out good roots, and I do carry water from the kitchen to water it and the others when I happen to be in town. That early tomato is already three times its original height, and may do something before frost. I like watching it grow, even if we don’t harvest anything.

The house came with many plants which flower on their own. The climbing roses are the most obvious, but we have a white hydrangea, peonies, and a lot of tiger daylilies. When we had the front porch replaced, the ancient bridal wreath bushes went out and were replaced by hosta and coralbells, which do fine on their own. Thank goodness.

What amuses me is that I have tried to plant/grow smaller flowers in the back yard (where the photo was taken) in the past, with bad luck. So what happened this year? We got what look like blackeyed Susans, obviously planted there by nature thanks to the birds who like to hide in the rosebush above. You can see them at the center of the photo.

Mom calls unexpected plants like this, “volunteers.” This volunteer is sunny and gorgeous between the rose and hydrangea on the east side of the garage. Go figure.

So here you are, all. A photo of a garden left to its own devices. Brian planted some swiss chard plants there for me, and one small parsley plant. Nothing else has been touched this year.

It is growing in spite of me. It looks, though, like hair blown about in the wind or slept on all funny. I think I’ll forgive it. The colors are cheerful enough to work magic on my mood.

2 Responses to “Hands-Free Gardening”

  1. Diana Troldahl Says:

    My garden is slowly being taken over by weed plants, but I still caught a glimpse of the daisies, and the hibiscus. And this was an ‘on’ year or the biennial hollyhocks. My view is moslty a slice I can see from the back door these days, but it cheers me up to see them growing, if not thriving.

  2. Karen Says:

    Love the idea of “volunteer” plants. I guess that can be translated into any surprise that brings joy! (Like colors–as in “Colorjoy”!)

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